SARDELLI, Federico Maria

Vivaldi´s Music for Flute and Recorder.

Federico Maria Sardelli writes from the perspective of a professional baroque flautist and recorder-player, as well as from that of an experienced and committed scholar, in order to shed light on the bewildering array of sizes and tunings of the recorder and transverse flute families as they relate to Antonio Vivaldi's compositions. Sardelli draws copiously on primary documents to analyse and place in context the capable and surprisingly progressive instrumental technique displayed in Vivaldi's music.

The book includes a discussion of the much-disputed chronology of Vivaldi's works, drawing on both internal and external evidence. Each known piece by him in which the flute or the recorder appears is evaluated fully from historical, biographical, technical and aesthetic standpoints. This book is designed to appeal not only to Vivaldi scholars and lovers of the composer's music, but also to players of the two instruments, students of organology and those with an interest in late baroque music in general.

Vivaldi is a composer who constantly springs surprises as, even today, new pieces are discovered or old ones reinterpreted. Much has happened since Sardelli's book was first published in Italian, and this new English version takes full account of all these new discoveries and developments. The reader will be left with a much fuller picture of the composer and his times, and the knowledge and insights gained from minutely examining his music for these two wind instruments will be found to have a wider relevance for his work as a whole. Generous music examples and illustrations bring the book's arguments to life.

Traducción al inglés a cargo de Michael Talbot del original en italiano publicado en Florencia en 2001.

Gran Bretaña, 2007. 358pp. Idionma: inglés. Encuadernación: cartoné con sobrecubierta.

 

 

Contents

List of Plates vii

List of Tables ix

List of Numbered Music Examples x

Preface xiv

Translator’s Note xix

Conventions and Abbreviations xxi

PART I: THE RECORDER AND FLUTE INITALY IN VIVALDI’S TIME

1 The Emancipation of the Recorder and Flute 3

2 Straight and Cross Flutes 7

3 The Recorder and Flute in Venice: the Role of Amateur Players 17

4 The Recorder and Flute in Venice: the First Professional Players 21

5 Other Players of the Recorder and Flute Associated with Vivaldi 37

6 Missing Workshops and Instruments 45

PART II: VIVALDI’S MUSIC FOR RECORDER AND FLUTE

7 Vivaldi’s Sonatas for Recorder and Flute 57

Sonatas for Transverse Flute 57

Sonatas for Recorder 70

A Distinguished Forgery: Il pastor fido 73

Sonatas for Two Instruments and Continuo 84

 

8 Vivaldi’s Chamber Concertos with Recorder or Flute 91

The Chamber Concerto: a New Genre 91

Lost and Spurious Works 93

The Earliest Examples 96

Other Chamber Concertos 104

The Choice of Instrument 125

9 Vivaldi’s Flute Concertos 139

True and False Attributions 139

New Works, Old Music: Vivaldi’s Opera decima 141

Beyond Op. 10 149

10 Vivaldi’s Recorder Concertos 163

11 Vivaldi’s Concertos for Flautino 177

The Instrument’s Identity 177

The Type of Flautino Used by Vivaldi 188

Date, Style and Special Characteristics 198

12 The Concerto for Two Flutes 205

13 The Concertos with Multiple Soloists and Orchestra 207

14 The Recorder and Flute in Vivaldi’s Vocal Music 233

Sacred Works 233

Cantatas 241

Serenatas 243

Operas 246

15 Remarks on Instrumental Technique 273

16 Conclusions 279

17 Postscript: A Late Discovery 283

Inventory of the Works for Recorder and Flute by Antonio Vivaldi 287

Bibliography 305

General Index 315

Index to the Vivaldi Works Mentioned 331