KOTTICK, E. L.

A history of the Harpsichord.  (+CD)

La historia del clavecín a lo largo de 600 años de existencia, con más de 200 fotografías e ilustraciones y un CD con grabaciones de varios de los instrumentos históricos descritos en el libro.

Bloomington, 2003. xvi + 517pp. Encuadernación: cartoné con sobrecubierta.

Kottick. History of the harpsichord.

Contents:
List of Plates and Illustrations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

1. From Psaltery and Monochord to Harpsichord and Virginal
1.1 Hermann Poll and the clavicembalum
1.2 The psaltery and the monochord
1.3 Iconographical evidence of the harpsichord
1.4 A digression on pitch and scal 1.5 The manuscript of Henri Arnaut
1.6 Clavichords and virginals
1.7 The Royal College of Music clavicytherium
1.8 Summing up

The Sixteenth Century

2. The Emergence of the Northern Harpsichord
2.1 Archival records
2.2 Germany and the Müller harpsichord
2.3 Antwerp and the virginals of Ioes Karest
2.4 France
2.5 England and the Theewes claviorganum
2.6 Summing up

3. Antwerp Harpsichord Building between Karest and Ruckers
3.1 Antwerp
3.2 The surviving virginals
3.3 A virginal by Hans Ruckers
3.4 The surviving grands
3.5 Summing up

4. Early Italian Style
4.1 The earliest Italian harpsichords
4.2 Harpsichords, Italian style
4.3 Virginals and spinets
4.4 Italian scales
4.5 Decoration
4.6 Venice and the tradition of opulence
4.7 Milan
4.8 Naples and elsewhere
4.9 Summing up

The Seventeenth Century
5. The Ruckers-Couchet Dynasty
5.1 The Ruckers and Couchet families
5.2 Virginals
5.3 Single-manual harpsichords
5.4 Double-manual harpsichords
5.5 The harpsichord/virginal combination
5.6 The late Couchet instruments
5.7 The decoration of harpsichords and virginals
5.8 The Flemish harpsichord as a cultural icon
5.9 Summing up

6. Later Italian Style
6.1 New developments in the seventeenth century
6.2 Rome
6.3 Florence
6.4 Naples and elsewhere
6.5 Anonymous instruments
6.6 Summing up

7. Seventeenth-Century International Style
7.1 Characteristics of International style
7.2 Regional distinctions
7.3 Summing up

8. France
8.1 Virginals and spinets
8.2 Harpsichord making in Paris
8.3 Lyons and elsewhere
8.4 Summing up

9. Germany and Austria
9.1 Virginals and spinets
9.2 Harpsichords
9.3 Austria
9.4 Summing up

10. England
10.1 Virginals
10.2 Bentside spinets
10.3 Harpsichords
10.4 Summing up

The Eighteenth Century
11. The Decline of the Italian Harpsichord
11.1 Florence
11.2 Rome and elsewhere
11.3 Summing up

12. The Iberian Peninsula
12.1 Spain
12.2 Maria Barbara's inventory
12.3 Later Spanish instruments
12.4 Portugal
12.5 The Portuguese piano tradition
12.6 Summing up

13. Harpsichord building in France to the Revolution
13.1 Ravalement
13.2 The development of the classic French harpsichord
13.3 The Ruckers-inspired French double
13.4 Decoration
13.5 The Blanchet-Taskin dynasty 13.6 Other Paris builders
13.7 Lyons and elsewhere
13.8 The late French harpsichord
13.9 Summing up

14. The Low Countries in the Post-Ruckers Era
14.1 Antwerp
14.2 Tournai
14.3 Elsewhere
14.4 Summing up

15. Germany, Scandinavia, Austria, and Switzerland
15.1 Rivals of the harpsichord 15.2 Hamburg
15.3 Scandinavia
15.4 Berlin
15.5 Hannover and Brunswick
15.6 Gross Breitenbach
15.7 Dresden
15.8 Freiberg
15.9 Augsburg
15.10 Austria
15.11 Switzerland
15.12 Summing up


16. Great Britain and America
16.1 Harpsichord building from 1700 to 1725
16.2 Hermann Tabel
16.3 Shudi, Kirkman, and their competitors

The Ruckers-inspired English harpsichord
Developments after 1760
16.4 Bentside spinets
16.5 Scotland and Ireland
16.6 America
16.7 Summing up

The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
17. The Harpsichord Hibernates
17.1 Some builders
17.2 The harpsichord played and preserved
17.3 Historicism and antiquarianism
17.4 Collectors and collections
17.5 Leopoldo Franciolini and the collectors
17.6 Summing up

18. The Harpsichord Revival from the Paris Exposition to World War II
18.1 The Paris Exposition of 1889 and the French builders
18.2 The "Bach" harpsichord and German builders
18.3 Arnold Dolmetsch and the English harpsichord
18.4 Wanda Landowska and her Pleyel
18.5 America and John Challis
18.6 Summing up

19. The Modern Harpsichord
19.1 Historically informed builders: Gough, Hubbard, and Dowd
Authenticity with stability: Herz, Schütze, and Rutkowski & Robinette
19.2 Built to last: de Blaise, Morley, and Sabathil
19.3 The Serien builders: Ammer, Neupert, Wittmeyer, and Sperhakke
19.4 New directions: John Challis and John Paul
19.5 The electronic harpsichord: Wittmeyer, Baldwin, and the electronic keyboard
19.6 Kits
19.7 Summing up

20. Into the future

Glossary
Bibliography

Appendix: Exploded views
Index